We teamed up with Midtown interior designer Stephanie Andrews and her talented group at Balance Design to get some ideas about what’s new for home decor in 2019.

Well-Adorned Walls

Bold, colorful wallpaper layered with fun and unique art makes a space sophisticated but approachable. Try this in a dining room, bedroom, library—really pretty much anywhere!

Curved Seating

In 2019, we’re looking for a little softness in design, and curved seating is like a visual hug. Nothing says “hey, hi, come sit down, relax, it’s all good” like a sofa that can gently cradle you. The best part about pieces like this? They fit in so many styles! 

Modern Pastels

Pastels seem to flit in and out of fashion, but this color palette of mint, blush and mustard yellow is modern and refreshing. These hues are often utilized as support for darker and bolder colors, and we’re happy to give them their time to shine! Adorning a sleek, modern space with these softies will instantly transform the feel from harsh to happy.

Deep, Dark Cabinetry

As shades of green, navy and warm wood stake their claim as the new “neutrals,” we see more and more people venturing out from the classic all-gray or white kitchen and bath color palette. This migration toward adding a bit more depth and personality is seen on walls, built-ins and cabinetry.

Modern Art Deco

We’re talking extravagant architectural elements, mixed metals and luxe materials. Inspiration from the ’20s has waltzed back into the design world with a modern attitude! This fresh mix creates an aura of opulence without stuffiness by allowing quirks and individuality to shine through. Giving us the freedom to be as over-the-top and “extra” as we want to be, modern art deco is a bold way to ring in 2019.

Statement Tile Layouts

We love a striking statement tile, but sometimes it can be scary to go all out with color. Not to worry! This doesn’t mean you’re relegated to same old, same old looks for your kitchen or bathroom. A fun way to get creative with tile is playing with the layout. Chevron or herringbone patterns are always a cool go-to, but we’re really loving multiple directions, varying sizes and bold grout.

Let’s talk about how this relates to the challenges of life in Midtown.

So many of our Midtown homes are being remodeled and renovated. What is your best advice for people overwhelmed and stressed by that process?

Hire a designer that partners with you, gets to know your style and presents a “master plan” that you can work with at your speed and within your budget.

What are the most important things that should be replaced first when redoing a home to give it a 2019 facelift?

Paint and wallpaper are the biggest impact items that can transform a home. Change the wall color, and your art and furniture will look completely different.  Another facelift item is updating your chandeliers and ceiling fans. Add a touch of weathered brass, or mix up the metals a bit so that not everything in the house is satin nickel.

What would you say is “the out with the old” and “in with the new” trends for 2019?

Out with the old is such a tricky question, because it stirs the pot! At Balance Design, since we spend our days immersed in thinking about looks, trends and spaces, I think we find we can get bored more easily than most people who are not constantly thinking about it. That being said, we are seeing an end to gray interior walls, industrial furniture, Edison bulb light fixtures and dark stained furniture.

Kitchens are the mainstay of most family homes. What do you see as the evolution of the kitchen space that we should prepare for?

Upper cabinets are really getting re-thought. So many of the kitchens that we are designing are being removed. In addition, the countertops are going up the walls for a clean, no-grout backsplash. These rooms are looking more like other rooms in the home, less like kitchens.

Artwork is important to Midtown homeowners. How should we choose what pieces adorn our walls?

We like to show our clients local art and then introduce them to the artists so that they can have a story to tell about the art when someone admires it. This is good for the client as well as helps support our local artists. Whenever possible, we suggest local, original art and handmade local accessories.