Making a difference in patient’s lives everyday

Dr. Jeffrey Marshall – Cardiologist

Dr. Jeffrey Marshall has always had a deep curiosity about science, and that’s what he believes led him into medicine. Plus, he was always inspired by the special relationship that doctors and patients seem to have.

“I just love that inside the exam room, we are blessed to have special relationships with our patients. No one else really gets to know somebody or help somebody quite that well in life,” Dr. Marshall said.

He actually feels that his biggest rewards come from his sickest patients. For example, having the ability to stop someone’s heart attack and to change the course of heart disease are his greatest priorities.

“I’m an interventional cardiologist, which means I put in stents. The amazing transformation in the ability to open blocked heart arteries has really been a disruptive technology in medicine. When I was a fellow, for instance, all we had was a balloon to try to open arteries,” he said.

 

Dr. Marshall is only about one of 40 doctors in the world to be named a “Master Interventionist” by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. He did most of his training in Virginia and was on the faculty of the Medical College of Virginia (now called Virginia Commonwealth University). In Gainesville, GA, he was part of a team that built a new heart program. He’s also served as Chairman of the State Board of Medicine in GA, as the President of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAY), and is currently the Governor of the American College of Cardiology for the state of Georgia. He’s also been involved in numerous research projects during his career.

 

Today, he serves as Chief of the Northside Cardiovascular Institute (NCVI), which just opened this year in Midtown.

 

“This area of Atlanta is undergoing a pretty amazing transformation or gentrification and a lot of retired people are actually moving back downtown. While we think of it as just a place for younger folks, in reality there are people there who need cardiovascular services, and it’s a great opportunity to serve those urban folks who have heart disease,” he said.

 

Northside Cardiovascular Institute is going to manage cardiovascular disease across all five Northside hospitals in order to provide a more integrated care model. Right now, the Institute has a total of 15 doctors.

 

“NCVI has been intrinsically involved in creating systems of care for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and was instrumental in creating a law in Georgia so that we can take care of people who are ill, and have made protocols for patients from the time they have the event until they are discharged. These types of systems of cardiac care are things that really save lives. And the NCVI wants to be a leader in all types of cardiology, but in that as well.”

His advice to doctors just starting out: “Treat your patients like you would want somebody to take care of your mom.”

 

Dr. Jessica Rubin – Fertility Specialist

Growing up, Dr. Jessica Rubin watched her father and grandfather, who were both physicians, interact with patients and saw how much fulfillment they derived from their daily profession. This inspired her to follow in their footsteps.

She tried to have an open mind when it was time to decide on a specialty, but in her heart, she knew she wanted to become a fertility doctor.

“I loved obstetrics and gynecology because I really liked the opportunity to form close relationships with my patients. And it’s such an intimate field of medicine that I felt like I was really making a difference. Plus, I really enjoyed that it was a combination of medical management as well as surgery,” she said.

In 2018, Dr. Rubin joined Reproductive Biology Associates (RBA) in Atlanta as a fertility specialist. Established in 1983, RBA was Georgia’s first in vitro fertilization (IVF) center and is the longest continuously operated fertility clinic in the country. RBA became the first practice in the state to produce an IVF birth, the first on the East Coast to achieve a pregnancy from a frozen embryo, and the first in the Western Hemisphere to report a birth from frozen donor eggs.

Dr. Rubin received her B.S. degrees in Science, Technology and Society as well as Hispanic Studies at Vassar College in New York, and earned her medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia and is board certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Inspired by her fascination with women’s health, she went on to complete a four-year residency at Emory University in Atlanta, and a fellowship at Baylor University of Houston, Texas.

She stressed that the field of fertility has become so much more successful than it was a few decades ago because of advances in the technology of freezing eggs, fertilizing eggs and growing them in the lab. This has really had a profound impact on the success rate, specifically the pregnancy rate, so a lot more people talk about IVF now.

“There’s nothing I love more than when people come back and bring in their babies. It’s just so much fun to see. That’s what makes me so excited for what I do,” she said.

Dr. Rubin’s focus is on fertility preservation, especially for women who have been diagnosed with cancer, in vitro fertilization, third party reproduction, and diminished ovarian reserve.

She mentioned that there used to be a stigma about fertility treatment but believes that has changed quite a bit. She encourages women who are interested in future pregnancies to come in and talk to a fertility specialist.

“Women should not be intimidated to come in; once they begin the process, it really helps move things along,” she said.

Her advice to new doctors is if you’re someone who likes to form strong connections with your patients, and who wants to have a good balance between clinical and surgical opportunities, then the field of reproductive endocrinology and infertility would be a really good match.

 

Dr SumayahTaliaferro

Dr Taliaferro is a proud native of Atlanta.  She grew up under the nurtured care of her mother, a teacher for 30 year, and surrounded by grandparents, aunts and uncles.  She attended Benjamin E Mays High School.  Her teacher’s there set high expectations for Sumayah and help shaped her to be the person she has become today. She grew up taking dance classes and developed a great appreciation for the classical arts. “I believe that through dance, I developed part of the discipline and confidence to succeed in many endeavors, including medicine” Says Sumayah.

 

She knew early on that she had an aptitude for science. She was accepted into a special program for math and science at Phillips Academy, one of the oldest private boarding schools in the country.  “Studying in Andover, Massachusetts during three summers in high school further nurtured my interest in science. After becoming a semi-finalist for the national Westinghouse Science Competition, I knew that I had what it takes to become a physician or research scientist.”

 Later,  she chose a career in dermatology because it combined her love of art and medicine. “In dermatology, I enjoy the ability to blend science with an artful approach to enhance or achieve beautiful skin” . After graduating from Brown University and Alpert Medical School of Brown University, she trained in the Yale Primary Care Internal Medicine Program, and completed her residency in dermatology at Howard University. 

She opened Atlanta Dermatology and Aesthetics, PC at Atlantic Station opened 2015 and offers comprehensive care in medical and cosmetic dermatology.  In addition to providing treatment and surveillance of skin cancer, the practice is known for providing innovative and thoughtful solutions for severe acne, aging skin, alopecia, and pigmentary disorders. New treatments are offered for vitiligo, eczema, psoriasis, acne scars, unwanted fat, and facial rejuvenation.  Current treatments include CoolSculpting, microneedling, skin tightening, Kybella and PRP . Cosmetic services include Fraxel®, IPL, facials, laser hair removal, Botox® injections, and soft tissue fillers.

Sumayah says”I have been impressed by advances in treatments for facial rejuvenation and the treatment of acne scars.  Now, patients can achieve effects that were previously only attainable by ablative procedures that were not always suitable for multiple skin complexions.  Newer, non-ablative devices and lasers are safer and achieve softer, more natural-appearing results that require minimal to no downtime.?

Sumayah still loves to take dance classes.  She enjoys reading, writing, supporting the arts community in Atlanta, serving at church, and participating in activities with The Links and her sorority, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.